Beast Riders Ltd

Pack your Pooch Safely and Comfortably with a Beast Rider !!


 
 

 

 

We are committed to our customers Satisfaction.

books to read

How To Speak To Dog

 

How to Speak Dog: 
by Stanley Coren

Mastering the Art of Dog-Human Communication

Animals In Translation

 

Animals in Translation
by Temple Grandin

The Working Pit Bull

 

The Working Pit Bull 
by Diane Jessup

The Other End of the Leash

 

The Other End of the Leash
by Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D.

The Power Of Positive Dog Training

 

The Power of Positive Dog Training  
by Pat Miller

Merle's Door

 

Merle's Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog 
by Ted Kerasote

 
Animals In Translation

 

Animals in Translation
by Temple Grandin

 


The Working Pit Bull

 

The Working Pit Bull 
by Diane Jessup

The Other End of the Leash

 

The Other End of the Leash
by Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D.

The Power Of Positive Dog Training

 

The Power of Positive Dog Training  
by Pat Miller

Merle's Door

 

Merle's Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog 
by Ted Kerasote

 

 

IN MEMORY OF OUR BIKER DOGS WHO

HAVE PASSED ON

 

 

Foxy     Nov 1982 - Dec 1997

Phantom     Apr 1992 - Oct 2006

Mariah     Aug 1993 - May 2010

Zima     Sept 1995 - Nov 2011

Petey     Feb 1996 - Oct 2012

Dragon     Aug 1997 - Jan 2013

Reggie  2001-May 2013



 

SELECTED POETRY



(My) Poor Dog Tray

By Thomas Campbell (circa 1799)


On the green banks of Shannon when Sheila was nigh
No blithe Irish lad was so happy as I
And no harp like my own could so cheerfully play
And wherever I went was my poor dog Tray

Poor dog, he was faithful and kind to be sure
And he constantly loved me although I was poor
When some sour-looking folks sent me heartless away
I had always a friend in my poor dog Tray

When the road was so dark and the night was so cold
And I and my dog were growing weary and old
How snugly we slept in my old coat of grey
And he licked me for kindness, my poor dog Tray

Though my wallet was scant I remembered his case
Nor refused my last crust to his pitiful face
Though he died at my feet on a cold winter's day
And I played a lament for my poor dog Tray

Where shall I go poor, forsaken and blind?
Shall I find one to guide me so faithful and kind?
To my dear native village so far, far away
I can never return with my poor dog Tray




Rainbow Bridge

by M.A. Preston


Just this side of heaven lies the Rainbow Bridge.

When a beloved pet dies, it goes to the the Rainbow Bridge. It makes friends with other animals and frolics over rolling hills and peaceful, lush meadows of green.

Our pets do not thirst or hunger. The old and sick are made young once more; the maimed and the ill become healed and strong. They are as healthy and playful as we remember them in days gone by.

Though happy and content, they still miss someone very special, someone they had to leave behind.

Together, the animals chase and play, but the day comes when a pet will suddenly stop and look into the distance... bright eyes intent, eager body quivering.  Suddenly recognizing you, your pet bounds quickly across the green fields and into your embrace. You celebrate in joyous reunion. You will never again separate. Happy tears and kisses are warm and plenty; your hands caress the face you missed. You look once more into the loving eyes of your pet and know you never really parted. You realize that though out of sight, your love had been remembered.

And now, you cross the Rainbow Bridge together....




A Dog's Plea

Author Unknown


Treat me kindly, my beloved friend, for no heart in all the world is more grateful for kindness than the loving heart of me.

Do not break my spirit with a stick, for though I should lick your hand between blows, your patience and understanding will more quickly teach me the things you would have me learn.

Speak to me often, for you voice is the world's sweetest music, as you must know by the fierce wagging of my tail when your footstep falls upon my waiting ear.

Please take me inside when it is cold and wet, for I am a domesticated animal, no longer accustomed to bitter elements. I ask no greater glory than the privilege of sitting at your feet beside the hearth.

Keep my pan filled with fresh water, for I cannot tell you when I suffer thirst.

Feed me clean food that I may stay well, to romp and play and do your bidding,  to walk by your side, and stand ready, willing and able to protect you with my life, should your life be in danger.

And, my friend, when I am very old, and I no longer enjoy good health, hearing and sight, do not make heroic efforts to keep me going. I  am not having any fun. Please see that my trusting life is taken gently. I shall leave this earth knowing with the last breath I draw that my fate was always safest in your hand.




An Honest Creature

Sydney Smith (circa 1835)


Here lies poor Nick, an honest creature,

Of faithful, gentle, courteous nature;

A parlour pet unspoiled by favour,

A patter of a good dog behaviour.

Without a wish, without a dream,

Beyond his home and friends at Cheam,

Contentedly through life he trotted

along the path that fate allotted;

Till Time, his aged body wearing,

Bereaved him of his sight and hearing,

Then laid him down without a pain

To sleep and never wake again.